Left Republican Review, No. 1
Date:2000
Publication:Left Republican Review
Issue:Number 1
July 2000
Contributors:Danny Morrison, Eoin Ó Broin, Ruth Tallion, Robbie McVeigh
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Discuss:Comments on this document

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Commentary From The Cedar Lounge Revolution

18th September 2017

Many thanks to the person who forwarded this to the Archive.

A range of documents were donated to the Archive from a number of groups and organisations from the 2000-2002 period. We’ll be posting them up over the Autumn in order to get a sense of the specific concerns during that period, now a good decade and a half ago. This is the first.

This publication, of which this is the first edition, edited by Eoin O’Broin, states:

LRR is an independent political platform bringing together left republican voices from across Ireland in a spirit of open debate. We aim to provoke discussion of political and organisational issues of concern to Irish republicans. We also aim to provide a platform to those forces and voices from across the globe who are struggling for independence and socialism.

The editorial continues in this vein, arguing that:

As we go to press the conflict resolution process in Ireland continues at a slow but steady pace. Despite recent crises, Unionists have re-entered the power sharing political institutions and the British government has made a start to its process of demilitarisation. While neither of these issue has been fully resolved there is at least some momentum. Not so, however, on the question of policing. Unionist and securocrat pressure has prevented any progress on this front. Whatever the outcome of the present debate on the British government’s policing bill, nothing short of the disbandment of the RUC will provide the new beginning to policing demanded by nationalists and other progressive forces across Ireland.

The contents is varied, with a piece by O’Broin on whether ‘republicanism is adapting to suit the changing times’. Ruth Tallion examines the ‘question of Women and the Equality Agenda’. Robbie McVeigh interrogates the Equality Agenda and the Peace Process. There’s a report on ‘Building the Basque Country’ in interviews with a range of figures involved in Basque politics. There’s also a roundup of books on Palestine.

Notable is how many of the contributions effectively take essay form. This clearly wasn’t intended to be a straightforward magazine.


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